Update from City Council, July 2020

On Tuesday Council took several actions.

First, Council approved allowing Accessory Dwelling Units – you can now build a second habitable structure on your property that meets certain guidelines. In general, I supported this measure. However, Nicole Stewart made a motion to gut most guidelines.

These guidelines included setbacks, heights, and landscaping as well as a prohibition against using the structures as AirBnB type vacation rentals. I felt that these guidelines would provide sufficient safeguards to maintain the peace, quiet, and property values of nearby homeowners. But, without these important guidelines, I voted against the measure.

Second, Council approved doubling the number of units for cottage courts and allowing them in R-2 and R-4 residential zoning districts. Originally, cottage courts (essentially, multifamily units with a common building for facilities such as laundry, recreation, etc) were limited to 15 units and were not allowed in R-2 and R-4 residential zoning districts. Now that limit has been increased to 30 units. This change effectively ends single family zoning in Raleigh. I voted against this measure.

Third, Council passed a change to allow four story buildings to go from 62 feet in height to 68 feet in height and a five story building to go from 75 feet in height to 80 feet in height. My main concerns with this change is that these buildings can be constructed directly adjacent to residential neighborhoods. My opinion is that adjacent to neighborhoods, the height should actually be reduced. Moreover, taller buildings are less environmentally friendly. They are less energy efficient, increase carbon emissions, increase visual pollution, and are more costly to construct and therefore, are less affordable. I voted against this motion.

Fourth, I did support a motion to add Juneteenth as a holiday.

Fifth, I did support a motion to send a letter to the legislature asking for City Council to have more autonomy related oversight of the Police Department. The specifics of that autonomy remain to be determined by the legislature. Effectively, this moves the discussion of police oversight to the state legislature.

Lastly, Council held a public hearing on the $80 million affordable housing bond. At the conclusion of the hearing I noted that Council has not specified exactly how that money will be spent. I do favor an affordable housing bond that will provide real affordable housing. I do not support a blank check for developers. In the end, Council did not adopt any policy about how the $80 million will be spent. As a consequence, I voted against approving the affordable housing bond.